Avocado Trees

Showing 1 - 4 of 4 items

Up to 18% off Cold Hardy Avocado Tree
Cold Hardy Avocado Tree

Sunlight: Full-Partial

Growth Rate: Fast

Harvest Time: September-November

Starting at $89.95

663 reviews
Growing Zones: 8-11 outdoors
Up to 16% off Hass Avocado Tree
Hass Avocado Tree

Sunlight: Full-Partial

Growth Rate: Fast

Harvest Time: February-September

Starting at $99.95

540 reviews
Growing Zones: 9-11 outdoors
Up to 8% off Condo™ Avocado Tree
Condo™ Avocado Tree

Sunlight: Full-Partial

Growth Rate: Moderate

Harvest Time: July-September

Starting at $99.95

64 reviews
Growing Zones: 9-11 outdoors
Sold Out Smoothie Kit
Smoothie Kit

Sunlight: Full Sun to Partial Sun

Growth Rate: Fast

Sold Out

Growing Zones: 8-11 outdoors

Grow your very own superfood, right from home.

avocados on a tree

If you thought store-bought avocados were delicious, just wait until you start growing your own! Your home-grown fruit will be richer in health benefits and flavor because they’re not being commercially grown and then shipped across the country, losing moisture and nutrients along the way.

Avocado Type Growing Zone Mature Height Year to Bear Annual Growth Spacing Full or Partial Sun Characteristics
Hass 9-11 Outdoors 4-11 Indoors 15-20ft 3 to 4 years Slow 5-8ft Full 6 to 8 Hours Oval shape with pebbly thick skin with a pale green flesh. Skin turns from green to an almost black color once ripe.
Cold Hardy (Mexicola, Brogdon, Bacon) 8-11 Outdoors 4-11 Indoors 15-20ft 4 to 5 years Slow 5-8ft Full 6 to 8 Hours Oval shape with smooth and thin green skin, along with yellowish-green flesh. The Mexicola Grande, Brogdon and Bacon avocados are all cold-hardy.
Day Avocado 9-11 Outdoors 4-11 Indoors 39-60ft 3 to 4 years Fast 20-30ft Full 6 to 8 Hours Club shaped avocado with smooth green skin.
Avocado Type: Hass
Growing Zone 9-11 Outdoors; 4-11 Indoors
Mature Height 15 to 20 feet
Year to Bear 3 to 4 Years
Annual Growth Slow (this is new text)
Spacing 5 to 8 feet
Full or partial Sun Full Sun: 6 to 8 Hours
Characteristics Oval shape with pebbly thick skin with pale green flesh. The skin turns from green to an almost black color once ripe.
Avocado Type: Cold Hardy (Mexicola, Brogdon, Bacon)
Growing Zone 8-11 Outdoors; 4-11 Indoors
Mature Height 15 to 20 feet
Year to Bear 4 to 5 Years
Annual Growth Slow
Spacing 5 to 8 feet
Full or partial Sun Full Sun: 6 to 8 Hours
Characteristics Oval shape with smooth and thin green skin, along with yellowish-green flesh. The Mexicola Grande, Brogdon and Bacon avocados are all cold-hardy.
Avocado Type: Condo Avocado
Growing Zone 9-11 Outdoors; 4-11 Indoors
Mature Height 3 to 5 feet
Year to Bear 3 to 4 Years
Annual Growth Fast
Spacing 10 to 20 feet
Full or partial Sun Full Sun: 6 to 8 Hours
Characteristics Club-shaped avocado with smooth green skin.

Where to Plant Avocado Trees

If you’re planting this tropical fruit tree as a container plant, make sure that you place it in an area that gets a minimum of 6 hours of sun per day. You should place it in front of a large window in your home that gets direct afternoon sunlight. If you’re able to plant your tree in the ground, then the best area to plant your tree would be the southern side of your home in an area that has well-drained soil. If your yard tends to hold a lot of water, you can amend the soil with sand or other gritty matter to soak up the moisture. Remember, you should plant your Avocado Tree in an area that gets 6 to 8 hours of sunlight per day.

Avocados are tropical trees, so they will prefer a warmer environment with lots of sun. The Haas and Condo Avocados can be grown outside in Zones 9-11, while the more cold-hardy Mexicola, Brodgon and Bacon varieties can be grown outside down to Zone 8. If you live in a colder, more northern climate, you can keep your container-planted Avocado outside in the sunny summer months, and bring it in when the temperatures start to drop in winter.

Avocado Trees Indoors

Avocados: What is Pollination?

A mature Avocado Tree may grow millions of green flower clusters during the flowering season. These flowers have both female and male organs, but they do not work at the same time. Though the Hass, Cold Hardy (Mexicola, Brogdon and Bacon varieties), and Condo are self-fertile, meaning you will get fruit with only one plant, more is always better. So, if you can’t live without Avocados, and you want those flowers to produce fruit, then cross-pollinating will work wonders for you.

When to Plant Avocado Trees

First, as previously stated, find an area that receives at least 6 to 8 hours of direct afternoon sunlight daily. Next, you will want to take your avocado tree out of the standard nursery pot that it was shipped in, and plant it in a container that is twice the size of the root ball and has drainage holes. The drainage holes will help to keep the plant from catching root rot, but you have to make sure you dump out the sitting water in the saucer because this can cause funguses to grow as well.

If you’re in the areas highlighted green on the map, that means you’re able to plant your tree in the ground year-round. If you’re planting multiple trees, make sure to leave about 5 to 8 feet of space between other trees and structures. Dig a hole that is two to three times wider and deeper than the container it was shipped in so that those roots have enough room to get established. These tropical fruits will need frequent deep waterings once or twice a week while letting the soil dry out a little between waterings. Do not fertilize your tree in the first year.

The only time you will need to prune your tree is in the late winter or early spring to get rid of dead wood. If you want to maintain a certain height, then you should trim the tree lightly by cutting the tallest branch off the tree. If you would also like to maintain the width, then you should trim the longest branch and work your way in each year by cutting another branch.

Avocado Trees Growing and Planting

When Do Avocado Trees Fruit?

Hass Avocados are ready to harvest as early as February to as late as September. Cold Hardy Avocados (Mexicola, Brogdon and Bacon) usually ripen between November and March, and Condo Avocados are harvested from July through September. However, it depends on the weather in your area, fertilization, and the bearing pattern of the tree. If you didn’t know by now, avocados have to be harvested by hand. If you do not pick the fruit they will not fall off the tree and will never ripen! The tree can be used as a storage unit for your savory avocados, also known as alligator pears, for as long as 8 months. The longer the fruit stays on the tree, the richer the taste.

Avocado Trees